Do You Know the 4 Customer Personality Types?

 

Imagine you are a car salesman named Bob who is talking to a potential customer, named Ted.

So you (Bob) decide to start having small talk with Ted, because this is how you approach every customer.

But your efforts don’t seem to work on Ted - you notice that Ted doesn’t talk too much (maybe he just hasn’t had his coffee yet???)

After a little while, Ted gets right to the point and asks about pricing on a luxury car.

Naturally, you know this is an expensive car, so to avoid immediate rejection,  you dance around the subject.

You start talking about all the cool features it has, all of the positive reviews it’s gotten, and why it’s the car everyone wants (as if social proof will guide his decision).

But your pitch wasn’t enough, because Ted thanks you and tells you he no longer needs your help.

In the business world, we see interactions like this all the time. People like Bob tend to communicate with every customer the exact same way, and it’s usually the style to which they respond best. So, while you (Bob) don’t care so much about facts and figures, Ted clearly does.

Why? Because Ted has a different customer personality type.

In this article, we’re going to help you better distinguish the type of customer you are selling your product or service to.

By learning how to cater to their concerns, you will have a better chance of closing the sale.

Here are the four customer personality types and how to sell to them:

#1: The Driver

Customers that identify with the driver are goal-oriented decision makers. They have a lot to manage and therefore have ZERO time for nonsense. They are results-driven leaders who need to make things happen in order to reach the success they desire.

The challenge with drivers is that they expect solutions to any problems that arise, regardless of how difficult it might be to achieve them. They also tend be very arrogant or domineering in nature, which can be pretty frustrating for people to work with.

How to Sell to a Driver:

Kiss the fluff goodbye. Embrace a go-getter’s mentality instead.

Be forthright and confident about what you’re offering - don’t beat around the bush. Present any relevant facts and metrics to show that your product or service is the perfect solution to their problem. And provide clear and easy steps on how to achieve those results.

They will not only respect you but appreciate you for not wasting their time. Plus, you’ll want a Driver as referral because they always have amazing connections.

#2: The Expressive

Customers like the Expressive are outgoing social junkies.

Unlike the Driver, they thrive on small talk, because to them, social communication is the easiest way for them to trust someone. They want each product or service they invest in the contribute to their desire to be accepted and adored. They are also great idea generators and love out-of-the-box concepts.

The downside is that they hardly ever follow through with their ideas, or really anything, to the end. If you talk facts and figures with them, they might completely tune you out. You could offer them a deal that NO one would turn down, but it won’t matter if they don’t feel like they can connect with you.

How to Sell to The Expressive:

Treat the Expressive like you’re on a date - get to know them a little before you make your next move.

Focus on building a relationship with them. Instead of immediately pitching about why they should buy a product or service, go meet them for lunch and get to know them. Keep the conversation light while still helping them focus on the purpose of your meeting. Building a foundation with an Expressive is the best way to gain a long-lasting customer.

#3: The Analytical

The Analytical customer personality values information. They need facts and figures and they are never afraid to ask more questions. These are the people that do their homework, analyzing every possibility before making a purchase. They, much like drivers, don’t like small talk (have an idea which type Ted was yet??). They like to get to the point while still discussing each option to ensure they are making the right decision.

How to Sell to the Analytical:

Instead of beating around the bush, provide them with accurate answers to their questions or concerns. There is no better way to ease the Analytical than to give them all the information they could possibly need to make a sound decision. Don’t take it personally if they fact-check you, because if you lack knowledge about a product, they won’t return.

The good news is, once they’re sold, they can become some of your most loyal customers.

#4: The Amiable

The Amiable customer is kind of like a picky hoarder in the best way possible. They don’t just do business, they build a network. They have a list professionals attached to every need in their life - the same doctor, lawyer, mechanic - and they rarely stray from them out of loyalty and fear of having to trust someone new. They have a strong need to belong and relate to a group. They are dependable, “go with the flow,” customers that want the best for everyone around them.

The challenge of working an Amiable is living up to their high expectations. They want you to deliver because they value consistency. And because it takes them a lot to truly trust others, it can be harder to close a deal with them. They don’t like impersonal facts and figures as much as they care about maintaining personal relationships.

How to sell to the Amiable:

Give them outstanding service, and do not settle for less. You can easily become their #1 referral to someone else, just as easily as you can find a bad review from them for a lack of effort. Instead of spewing off facts and figures to appease them, present them with positive customer reviews. Ask them for input, make them feel involved and appreciated in some capacity, and you will land yourself a top spot on their referral list.


So, what’s the takeaway, here?

If you’re a business owner, entrepreneur, or employee then you’ve probably had to communicate with another human being. And while you can develop a foolproof, standard formula for talking with a client, the same approach won’t work for everyone, and there’s a good reason for that.

By taking time to understand your customers, you are closing the gap between their apprehension and your next sale.

Learn to embrace their differences, and with a little effort, you can harness a strong, loyal customer base.

And these days, that’s pretty hard to find.